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GOLDEN HIND

SKU: TS0039W

Specification:

67L x 14W x 59H(cm) or 26.38H x 5.51W x 23.23H (inch)

80L x 20W x 78H (cm) or 31.50L x 7.87W x 30.71H (inch)

Packing volume:

Product Name Price Qty
GOLDEN HIND - TS0039W-60
GOLDEN HIND - TS0039W-80

Categgory:
- TALL SHIPS

GOLDEN HIND

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Details

The model is scratch built with planks on frame construction method from the drawings. The wood used to build the hull is plantation acacia and the wood on the deck is joined by small pieces of poplar or mahogany wood together like the original boat to increase the value of the model. The base is made of the MDF. You can notice that the model is painted like the color of the original ship. The finished model is fully assembled and ready for display.

Color: Natural wood

 

HISTORY

The Golden Hind or Hinde was an English galleon best known for itscircumnavigation of the globe between 1577 and 1580, captained by Sir Francis Drake. She was originally known as the Pelican, but was renamed by Drake mid-voyage in 1578, as he prepared to enter the Strait of Magellan, calling it the Golden Hind to compliment his patron, Sir Christopher Hatton, whose armorial crest was a golden 'hind' (a female deer). Hatton was one of the principal sponsors of Drake's world voyage.

In 1577, Elizabeth I of England chose Sir Francis Drake as the leader of an expedition intended to pass around South America through the Strait of Magellan and to explore the coast that lay beyond. The queen's support was advantageous; Drake had official approval to benefit himself and the queen as well as to cause the maximum damage to the Spaniards. This would eventually culminate in the Anglo–Spanish War. Before setting sail, Drake met the queen face-to-face for the first time and she said to him, "We would gladly be revenged on the King of Spain for divers injuries that we have received." The explicit object was to "find out places meet to have traffic." Drake, however, acted as a privateer, with unofficial support from Queen Elizabeth.

He set sail in December 1577 with five small ships, manned by 164 men, and reached the Brazilian coast in the spring of 1578. Drake's flagship, the Pelican, which he renamed the Golden Hinde, displaced only about 100 tons.

On 1 March 1579, now in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of Ecuador, the Golden Hind challenged and captured the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de la Concepción. This galleon had the largest treasure captured to that date: over 360,000 Pesos. The six tons of treasure took six days to transship. 

On 26 September 1580, Francis Drake sailed his ship into Plymouth Harbour with only 56 of the original crew of 80 left aboard. Despite his piratical conduct on his voyages, Queen Elizabeth herself went aboard the Golden Hind, which was lying at Deptford in theThames Estuary, and personally bestowed a knighthood on him; her share of the treasure came to almost £160,000: "enough to pay off her entire foreign debt and still have £40,000 left over to invest in a new trading company for the Levant. Her return and that of other investors came to £47 for every £1 invested, or a total return of 4,700%."

After Drake's circumnavigation, the Golden Hind was maintained for public exhibition in Deptford. This is the earliest known example of a ship being maintained for public display because of its historic significance. Golden Hind remained there for nearly 100 years before she eventually rotted away and was finally broken up.

The table in the Middle Temple Hall (in London) is reputed to have been made from the wood of the Golden Hind, as is a chair in the Great Hall, Buckland Abbey, Devon.